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Entries in recipes (700)

Thursday
Apr092015

Fleur de Sel Shortbread with Vanilla Halvah

Cookie Love by Mindy Segal

You guys. I was super excited to receive a review copy of Mindy Segal's new book, Cookie Love. Why?

Well, a few reasons. 

For one, she's the proprietress of Chicago foodie landmark Hot Chocolate. Even if you've never been there, if you go to their website, the establishment is explained thusly: "Restaurant. Dessert Bar. Pastries." You should already be halfway in love. If you ever go, I promise you'll be the rest of the way in love.

Second, the recipes look AWESOME. You could seriously just buy this book and look at the pictures for the rest of your life, it would be worth the investment just for that.

But your life would be even better still if you made these cookies: Fleur de Sel Shortbread with Vanilla Halvah. 

Discover them here with this awesome excerpt recipe. 

A note from Mindy: 

I AM ALWAYS ON a quest to find more ways to use halvah in desserts. Coffee, chocolate, and cocoa nibs are my usual pairings with the Middle Eastern sesame confection, but one day I shifted gears in favor of vanilla and fleur de sel. It worked—halvah anchored the vanilla-flecked frosting, for a sweet, salty, nutty result. To finish the cookies, I dip them partially in dark milk chocolate and then place a shaving of halvah on top. The frosting is seasoned well to balance its sweetness, but because the cookies themselves carry a noticeable salt level, you may prefer to add less. 

Fleur de Sel Shortbread with Vanilla Halvah

makes approximately 28 sandwich cookies

SHORTBREAD
11⁄2 cups plus 2 tablespoons (13 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature 11⁄4 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted
2 extra-large egg yolks, at room temperature
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sea salt flakes

FROSTING
8 ounces plain or vanilla halvah, cubed
2 ounces white chocolate, melted
11⁄4 cups (10 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 cup confectioners’ sugar, sifted
1⁄2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
1⁄2 teaspoon sea salt flakes, or to taste

TO FINISH
Piece of plain or vanilla halvah, for garnish 8 ounces milk chocolate, melted

Step #1: Make the Shortbread
In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the butter on medium speed for 5 to 10 seconds. Add the sugar and mix on low speed to incorporate. Increase the speed to medium and cream the butter mixture until it is aerated and looks like frosting, 3 to 4 minutes. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula to bring the batter together.

Put the yolks in a small cup or bowl and add the vanilla. In a bowl, whisk together the flour and salt.

On medium speed, add the yolks, one at a time, and mix until the batter resembles cottage cheese, approximately 5 seconds for each yolk. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula to bring the batter together. Mix on medium speed for 20 to 30 seconds to make nearly homogeneous.

To cut out the cookies, you will need a rectangular cutter approximately 13⁄4 by 21⁄2 inches. To pipe the frosting, you will need the Ateco tip #32. 

Cookie Love by Mindy Segal page1image22832

Add the flour mixture all at once and mix on low speed until the dough just comes together but still looks shaggy, approxi- mately 30 seconds. Do not overmix. Remove the bowl from the stand mixer. With a plastic bench scraper, bring the dough completely together by hand.

Stretch two sheets of plastic wrap on a work surface. Divide the dough in half and place each half on a piece of the plastic wrap. Pat each half into a rectangle, wrap tightly, and refrigerate until chilled throughout, at least 2 hours or preferably overnight.

Let the dough halves sit at room tempera- ture until the dough has warmed up some but is still cool to the touch, 15 to 20 minutes.

Put a sheet of parchment paper the same dimensions as a half sheet (13 by 18-inch) pan on the work surface and dust lightly with flour. Put one dough half on top.

Using a rolling pin, roll the dough half into a rectangle approximately 11 by 13 inches and 1⁄4 inch thick or slightly under. If the edges become uneven, push a bench scraper against the dough to straighten out the sides. To keep the dough from sticking to the parchment paper, dust the top with flour, cover with another piece of parchment paper, and, sandwiching the dough between both sheets of parch- ment paper, flip the dough and paper over. Peel off the top layer of parchment paper and continue to roll. Any time the dough starts to stick, repeat the sand- wiching and flipping step with the parchment paper.

Ease the dough and parchment paper onto a half sheet pan. Repeat with the remaining dough half and stack it on top. Cover with a piece of parchment paper and refrigerate the layers until firm, at least 30 minutes.

Heat the oven to 350°F. Line a couple of half sheet pans with parchment paper.
Let the dough sit at room temperature for up to 10 minutes. Invert the dough onto a work surface and peel off the top sheet of parchment paper. Roll a dough docker over the dough or pierce it numerous times with a fork. Using a 1 3⁄4 by 2 1⁄2-inch rectangular cutter, punch out the cookies. Reroll the dough trimmings, chill, and cut out more cookies.

Put the shortbread on the prepared sheet pans, evenly spacing up to 16 cookies per pan.

Bake one pan at a time for 10 minutes. Rotate the pan and bake until the cookies feel firm and hold their shape when touched, 3 to 5 minutes more. Let the cookies cool completely on the sheet pans. Repeat with the remaining pan.

Step #2: Frost the Cookies
Blend the halvah in a food processor until fairly smooth. Drizzle in the white chocolate and blend until incorporated. The halvah will turn into a thick paste.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the butter briefly on medium speed for
5 to 10 seconds. Add the sugar and beat until the butter mixture is aerated and pale in color, 3 to 4 minutes. Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula to bring the frosting together. Briefly mix in the vanilla and salts until incorporated, approximately 1 minute. Add the halvah paste and mix until smooth, with a little texture left from the halvah.

Fit a pastry bag with the Ateco tip #32 and fill with the frosting.
Make pairs of similar-size cookies. Turn half of the cookies over. Leaving an 1⁄8-inch border, pipe rows of dots 
onto the cookies. The frosting should be approximately as thick as the cookie. Top each frosted cookie with a second cookie and press lightly to adhere.

Step #3: Finish the Cookies
Freeze the piece of halvah until chilled, 30 minutes.

Line two half sheet pans with parchment paper. Dip a quarter of the long side of each sandwich cookie into the milk chocolate, shake off the excess, and place on the prepared pans. Using a vegetable peeler, shave
a piece or two of halvah and place onto the chocolate- dipped part of each cookie. Refrigerate until the chocolate is firm, approximately 1 hour.

The cookies can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 week. 

Enjoy! 

Buy the book here: Cookie Love

Wednesday
Apr082015

CakeSpy for Craftsy: Delicious Maple Walnut Scones Recipe

In general, I don't like scones. Because most of them are like cardboard with icing, especially at commercial coffee shops.

But homemade is a different thing entirely. Homemade scones are biscuit-y, crumbly, and nice and hefty and rich. And this recipe, for maple walnut scones with maple glaze (made using the good stuff, from Vermont!), is a winner.

They're easy to make and will make your mouth happy, so what are you waiting for?

Find the recipe here. 

Thursday
Apr022015

Homemade Ruby Gem Candy a la Erin Bakes

Homemade candy gems

Your snacks should be just as fancy as you are. And you're fancy, I can just tell.

While diamonds are dandy, rubies make a more delightful inspiration for candy. These bright red candy gems look super fancy, but don't require a trip to Tiffany or Cartier to obtain. All you need is a candy mold, a little time, and hopefully some aggression (don't worry, I'll explain). 

Homemade candy gems

This easy and fun craft/snack is inspired by Erin Gardner, a cake decorator extraordinare who led me through the process on her awesome blog, Erin Bakes.

Homemade candy gems

Candy gems

Adapted from Erin Bakes

  • red translucent hard candies (I used Brach's cinnamon candies, but you could use jolly ranchers or life savers)
  • Small zip-top bags
  • Rolling pin
  • a heatproof candy mold with gem-like vessels

Procedure

  1. Position a rack in the middle position of your oven. Preheat the oven to 275 degrees F.
  2. Unwrap a bunch of candies and place them in your sturdy bag.
  3. Using the rolling pin, take out your aggression (remember? You need it now!) on the poor candy that never did anything to you. Go ahead, show it who's boss. 
  4. Since I used a silicone mold, I didn't grease the vessels, but Erin Bakes suggests that if you use a more firm candy mold, you should "Spray pan spray onto a paper towel and use the greased towel to wipe the cavity of your gem mold. This provides enough of a barrier to pop the gem out later, but not so much grease that it makes your gems cloudy."
  5. Fill the molds with your candy bits. 
  6. Gently place the filled molds on top of a cookie sheet, then pop it in the oven. Heat for as little as 5 minutes, or as much as 15 minutes, depending on the sturdiness of the candy you use (start checking after 5 minutes). It will progress from droopy candy to totally melty. Once totally melty, remove the pan from the oven. Erin advises, "If the gem is not as full as you’d like, sprinkle in a little more candy and place the tray back into the oven for another minute or so. Just long enough for the additional candy to melt."
  7. Let the molds cool for several minutes before handling the molds. About 10-20 minutes after they've been removed, your candies will be ready to remove. I simply inverted the mold and kind of squeezed them out. 

Ruby gem candy

You've got yourself a glamorous little snack here! 

Thursday
Mar262015

Homemade Thin Mints Recipe

Thin Mints - homemade

OMG. You can make one of the best Girl Scout cookies in your very own kitchen! No weird stabilizers included.

Find the recipe here.

Monday
Mar232015

Cadbury Creme Egg Rolls

Calm down. They're just Cadbury Creme Egg Rolls.

WAIT. CADBURY CREME EGG ROLLS!?! I AM A GENIUS. 

I know, all caps are annoying. But in the case of the last series of words, it was necessary. Because Easter has come early this year with my tastiest Creme Egg creation yet: Cadbury Creme Egg Rolls. 

I've delved into Asian-meets-Creme-Egg fusion before, with my Cadbury Creme Egg Foo Young recipe from a few years ago. I've also re-created many specimens of classic cuisine with a sweet twist, including Cadbury Creme Egg Salad, Cadbury Creme Deviled Eggs, Cadbury Creme Eggs Benedict, Cadbury Creme Scotch Eggs, and of course, Cadbury Creme Egg in Hole Toast

But these? These are special. Because they are fried, can be served with sauce, it's true, but mostly because, well, just look at them. 

Cadbury Creme Egg Rolls

The best news is that if you want to make Cadbury Creme Egg Rolls, you don't need a lot of time or ingredients. Really. Let me tell you how.

First, you'll grab four Cadbury Creme eggs, a tube of pop-n-bake crescent rolls, and some flaked coconut. You'll rustle up a large pan and put a bunch of oil in it. 

Then, you'll engage in a montage (80s music encouraged) involving these steps to assemble your egg rolls (don't worry, the full recipe is below).

Once you've done that, you'll heat up the oil and get your egg roll tossin' hands ready*... 

(* = don't actually toss. Gently place them in the oil. Don't ruin your pretty face with hot oil spatter, please.) 

Cadbury Creme Egg Rolls

and fry them to golden perfection. Let them cool slightly then enjoy the gooey rewards contained within. 

Cadbury Creme Egg Rolls

 

Cadbury Creme Egg Rolls

  • 4 Cadbury Creme Eggs
  • Flaked coconut (half a cup or so)
  • 8 crescent rolls from a package

 Procedure

  1. Put the Creme Eggs in the freezer for about 10 minutes. This will help them become firm when you chop them in a bit.
  2. Unroll the crescent rolls, and divide into 8 perforated portions. Ignore the triangle shape, and mush each one into a ball. 
  3. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough as thin as it will go without seeming like it will break. 
  4. Place some coconut on top of the rolled dough. 
  5. Your Creme eggs are ready about now, I'd say. Take them out of the fridge, and cut each egg in half. You now have 8 portions. 
  6. Cut each portion coarsely, and put it along the coconut on the spread crescent dough. 
  7. Roll it up, burrito-style. Here's how:
  8. Heat up the oil. Once you think it's hot, test it by tossing a little crumb of crescent dough inside. If it starts bubbling furiously, you're good to go.
  9. Fry each one (don't do more than 2 at a time, it's just easier to manage that way) until golden on both sides.
  10. Remove from the frying pan and set on paper towels to blot excess oil.
  11. Enjoy warm. Serve with melted chocolate sauce for dipping, if desired (suggested). 

You may also like:

Cadbury Creme Egg Salad

Cadbury Creme Egg Salad

Cadbury Creme Egg Foo Young

Cadbury Creme Egg Foo Young

Cadbury Creme Deviled Eggs 

Cadbury Creme Deviled Eggs

Cadbury Creme Eggs Benedict

Cadbury Creme Eggs Benedict

Cadbury Creme Scotch Eggs

scotch eggs

Cadbury Creme Egg in Hole Toast

Cadbury creme egg in hole toast

 Would you eat a Cadbury Cream Egg roll?

Monday
Mar232015

Gluten-Free Chocolate Bundt Cake

There is no good reason to not have cake in your life. 

If you're gluten-free and eating cake made with cake flour is not good for your health, you might have to bake a little differently, but ultimately, your favorite treats should not be off limits. The new book Gluten-Free Flour Power: Bringing Your Favorite Foods Back to the Table wants to enable you to bring your favorite desserts back into your life. 

This guest recipe for chocolate bundt cake is a very special one indeed, rich and dense and practically perfect in every way. And plus, it gives you the opportunity to say "I like big bundts and I cannot lie".

Yep. With that, here's the recipe.

Jenny’s chocolate bundt cake

makes 1 small Bundt cake

We created this for Jenny, a family member and good friend. She was diagnosed with celiac disease a few years ago and was worried that she’d never enjoy our cakes and cookies again. This cake is one of the first things we made for her, and it quickly became a favorite. It’s moist and chocolaty, with a tender crumb. Aki likes just a dusting of powdered sugar instead of icing.

  • 2 cups / 260 grams Gluten-Free Flour Blend (recipe below)
  • 1 cup / 85 grams high-quality natural cocoa powder
  • 16 tablespoons (2 sticks) / 8 ounces / 225 grams unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 2 cups / 400 grams granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon / 6 grams fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon / 5 grams baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon / 3 grams baking powder
  • 4 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 cup / 225 grams buttermilk, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup / 30 grams powdered sugar for dusting

Procedure

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. (180°C.). Butter a 7½-inch (6-cup) Bundt pan and dust with flour.
  2. Whisk together the flour and cocoa in a medium bowl. Set aside.
  3. Put the butter, granulated sugar, salt, baking soda, and baking powder in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with thepaddle attachment (or use hand mixer) and beat on low until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing until each one is fully incorporated before adding the next.
  4. Add one-third of the flour mixture and mix until just blended.Add half the buttermilk and mix until just blended. Repeat with half of the remaining flour mixture, followed by theremaining buttermilk, and then the last of the flour mixture. Scrape the batter into the prepared cake pan.
  5. Bake for 55 to 65 minutes, until the cake springs back when lightlytouched and a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean; the internal temperature should be 203° to 208°F.(95° to 98°C.).
  6. Let cool in the pan on a rack for 15 minutes, then turn out onto a rack to cool completely. Just before serving, dust the top of the cake with the powdered sugar. The cake will keep in an airtight container for up to a week.

Gluten-free flour blend: "What Iif" blend

makes 15½ cups / 2020 grams flour blend

What if you had a gluten-free flour that worked in any recipe as a gram-forgram substitute for all-purpose flour? That was the question was asked ourselves when we developed this blend. “IiF” stand for Ideas in Food, our blog, where we published the very first version of this recipe. Alex came up with it for fun after reading the ingredient list on Cup4Cup flour (developed by Lena Kwak and chef Thomas Keller), and it worked beautifully. It’s gone through a few changes since the original, hence the 3.0, but it remains the easiest gluten-free blend to work with. It mimics all-purpose flour in recipes and for that reason, using a gram-for-gram substitution in any traditional recipe will give you comparable results.

  • 700 grams cornstarch
  • 500 grams tapioca starch
  • 300 grams white rice flour
  • 200 grams brown rice flour
  • 200 grams nonfat milk power
  • 100 grams potato flour
  • 20 grams xanthan gum

Whisk together all the ingredients in a bowl. Store in airtight container at room temperature for up to 6 months.

Reprinted from Gluten-Free Flour Power: Bringing Your Favorite Foods Back to the Table by Aki Kamozawa and H. Alexander Talbot. Copyright © 2015 by Aki Kamozawa and H. Alexander Talbot. With permission of the publisher, W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tuesday
Mar172015

Video: How to Make Olive Oil Coconut Macaroons

Hi guys and girls! I made a video explaining the art of how to make coconut macaroons with olive oil. SPOILER: it does include a pug, and unicorns. 

View the full recipe here

Sunday
Mar152015

20 Tasty Green Foods For St. Patrick's Day

The theme of today's post is GREEN. That's the color associated with St. Patrick's day, and the color of all the food you should eat on March 17. Here are 10 green foods that can help you celebrate. Pairing with green beer optional. 

1. Mint chocolate chip whoopie pies

Mint chocolate chip whoopie pies

Whoopie pies are great. But whoopie pies inspired by the prettiest ice cream flavor? All the better, and very appropriate for St. Patrick's Day. Recipe here

2. Watergate cake

Watergate Cake (Pistachio Pudding Mix Cake)

The connection to the scandal is tenuous at best. Following Watergate, many foods flavored with pistachio (said to be a favorite of Richard Nixon's) were dubbed after the scandal. This cake is only scandalous in its deliciousness. Recipe here

3. Green Irish soda bread

Green Irish Soda Bread

Well, this one's easy. Take your favorite Irish Soda bread recipe...and add green food coloring. I much prefer this method to letting it mold over. The food coloring is a more delicious variation of green. Recipe here (untinted). 

4. Candy salad

Sweet Salad

Possibly the tastiest method of eating your greens, ever. That isn't actual salad - it's candy and cake configured to look like it! Recipe here

5. Princess cake

Miette Princess Cake

I can't say with 100 percent certainty why it's green, but it typically is, and it's a fun and fancy food. Featured in my second book, The Secret Lives of Baked Goods.

6. Shamrock shakes

Shamrock Shake

Photo via Flickr member vasenka

It's not up to me to judge whether you make a homemade version or buy it at the evil empire fast food retailer. But it is a classic green food around this time of year. Homemade version recipe here.

7. Pistachio chocolate chip cookies

Chocolate Chip Pistachio Cookies

This is one of my favorite cookie recipes in the world. Find out why...Recipe here

8. Something healthy

Green smoothie

You can consider this intermission, or consider the fact that I made a banana and kale smoothie, and it actually tasted good. Recipe here.

9. Avocado cake

Chocolate Avocado Cake

This remains one of my favorite recipes for Serious Eats. It basically employs avocado wherever a normal recipe would call for butter (I actually used butter, too, though). Recipe here

10. Green tea ice cream

Green Tea Ice Cream

Photo via Flickr member Dong Kwan

I seem to see green tea ice cream on frequent offer at sushi places, but not so much at ice cream parlors. If you want, make your own, for a dignified green treat. Recipe here

11. Mint oreo stuffed brownie cupcakes Finalist 8: Stuffed Brownie Cupcakes (with chocolate covered mint oreos)

Go ahead. Stuff your cupcakes with mint fudge covered Oreos. It's only St. Patrick's day once a year. More info here.

 

12. Butter mint bars

Butter mint bars

A sugar cookie base with a thick, rich buttercream topping. I don't care that they're a Christmas treat. They're tasty right now, too. Recipe here

13. Pistachio pudding pops

Pistachio pudding pop

So simple. So perfect. This is my favorite flavor for Jell-O pudding pops. Or, fancy them up and make a two-tone variation. Recipe here

14. Avocado pie

Avocado Pie from Curio Confections Pie-Off

Pie? With avocado? Believe it. It's actually quite good. Recipe here

15. Mint chocolate chip ice cream Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream (with Sprinkles) - Week #10 for "52 of 2014" 

Photo via Flickr member aukirk

If you are one of those people who prefers the white variety of mint ice cream, then please, stay in bed all day on the 17th. I suggest, for the full experience, going to a local ice cream shop and picking this up. Read about how I shipped a mint chocolate chip ice cream cone to myself

16. Mint Nanaimo bars Nanaimo bars

Nanaimo bars are delicious any time of year, and making them minty gives you a reason to make the middle green and to call them St. Patrick's day appropriate. Recipe here

17. Frog cupcakes

Frog cakes

I suppose that you could make these sweet treats, but it's more fun to find them in their natural element. Read my essay about the Curious Case of the Frog Cupcakes.

18. Green buttercream

Peppermint Patty Cupcake, Common Ground, Renton

If you're making cupcakes on March 17, I don't care what flavor they are. Tint your buttercream green. That's all.

19. Mint chocolate chip cookies Green holiday cookies

All it takes is some doctored up cookie mix to make these tasty green cookies, which are inspired by the ice cream flavor. Recipe here

20. Green bagels

 Green Bagels

It's possible that your local grocery store or bagel shop has green bagels on the 17th. If they do, buy them. You must! Or, tint a batch of your own. (Untinted) Recipe here

BONUS: rainbow cookies

How to make NYC style rainbow cookies

They're a treasure, and they're not at the end of the rainbow: they ARE the rainbow. Or, make them all green for a St. Patrick's day treat. Recipe here

What's your favorite green food?

Thursday
Mar122015

How to Make Paleo Coffee, AKA Bulletproof Coffee

Paleo coffee DIY

When I was in Asheville, several of my yoga school classmates became hooked on something sold at the Whole Foods nearby called "Paleo Coffee". Well, I didn't have too much interest in it until someone told me it contained butter.

What? Coffee with butter? That sounded awesome!

I was intrigued, and when I tried the stuff, I found that it was quite agreeable. Turns out, it was not only butter but coconut oil in addition that gave the coffee its rich, creamy flavor. Yes, I liked the stuff.

After Asheville, I promptly forgot about it until I happened upon this article in In Touch Weekly (one of my guilty pleasures fo'sho). I had to roll my eyes at it a bit, but then again, I have to say that the butter diet is one of the better ones I've come across. 

Paleo coffee DIY

They called it "bulletproof coffee" but it was the same thing that Whole Foods in Asheville had deemed Paleo Coffee. Either way, I think this stuff is worth a try. It's far cheaper to make it at home (I've seen it for sale between $4 and a whopping $8 per cup) and it's pretty delicious. While I will never ever suggest a fad diet to you, I think that this buttery coffee is a curiosity that is worth trying at least once! 

Paleo coffee DIY

Paleo Coffee, or "Bulletproof" Coffee

inspired by In Touch Weekly and Greenlife of Asheville 

  • 2 cups (16 oz) hot brewed coffee
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter (I used unsalted) 

Procedure: It's as easy as combining all of the ingredients, but I will give you a few small tips. First, you'll definitely want to use super hot coffee, because it needs to be hot to allow the coconut oil, which is solid at room temperature, become liquid, and the butter to melt. Second, I suggest pouring the mixture into a bowl and mixing it all together with a whisk, because if you just stir with a spoon in the cup, it won't be vigorous enough to make the butter droplets go away. I find that it just looks better when mixed thoroughly.

Paleo coffee DIY

Finally, be sure to drink it while it's quite hot. The fat will begin to separate as it cools, making for a less appetizing visual.

Have you ever tried bulletproof or paleo coffee? 

Thursday
Mar122015

Actually Good: Stout Beer Ganache

Do you like beer? 

Beer ganache

In general, I do not. But in recent years I have come to appreciate a few what I will call "fancy beers" - the type that cost more than the average six pack, have the word "handcrafted" somewhere on the packaging, and that the average football watching dude would probably scoff at. 

The only problem is that a lot of the fancy beers only come in 22 ounce bottles. Now, as an occasional beer drinker, this is an insanely large quantity to me; I have never and probably will never be able to finish an entire bottle. And as it simply isn't the same the next day (flat!) and I'm the only one in my house who drinks it, it has been relegated to "occasional" treat, and I usually end up throwing out the un-consumed portion. 

I hate waste.

So the last time I bought a fancy-ish beer called Cappuccino Stout, I had some, and then decided to experiment with the rest.

What would happen if I substituted fancy beer for cream in a ganache recipe? What would beer ganache taste like? 

Well, given the success of chocolate stout cupcakes, I figured there was a chance that I could be successful. So I heated up the beer, and then mixed it with mixed dark and milk chopped chocolate in an equal quantity. 

I let it sit until it firmed a bit, and here's what it looked like.

Beer Ganache

And as for the taste? Surprisingly good. Like, actually good. The beer didn't so much taste beer-y anymore, but it more imparted a malty, caramelly taste to the chocolate. If I had been given a sample and you'd asked me to do a blind taste, I would have said that it was some sort of malted chocolate sauce.

Stout beer ganache is definitely worth your time. I think I'll try it on top of brownies next! 

Actually-Good Beer Ganache

Note: you can use whatever quantity you like, as long as the beer and chocolate are in equal weights. 

  1. Put the beer in a saucepan over medium heat until it begins to bubble (not to be confused with the fizz), like it's just shy of boiling. 
  2. Beer Ganache
  3. Either add the chocolate to the pan, or pour the hot beer over chocolate in a heatproof bowl.
  4. Beer Ganache
  5. Mix until combined, and the chocolate has melted.
  6. Let set until it has reached cool room temperature. Enjoy as a cake filling, icing, or as a tasty dip for cookies.
  7. Beer Ganache

Would you ever try beer ganache?

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